The Red Earth Project


Introduction
  1. Overview    
  2. Research
  3. A Lecture at Princeton

The Book
  1. About
  2. Red Earth in the Paris Review
  3. Themes
  4. Form
  5. Where to buy

Process and Output
  1. Conceptual Development
  2. Photography
  3. Prose
  4. Computational and Subjective Translation
  5. Digital to Physical
  6. Process 1: Process and Theory
  7. Process 2: Making
  8. Compositions

Selected Works
  1. Red Earth, The Book
  2. Ever Abeokuta
  3. Colonial Enterprise
  4. Red Earth
  5. Amor Fati
  6. Direct Translation Diptychs 1, 2, 3 & 4
  7. Sixteenth Century Technology
  8. How Can Time Become a Circle
  9. Deference
  10. Solitary Breath

Exhibitions & Performances
  1. Studio Hanniball
  2. Archive of Forgetfulness
  3. Listening to the Red Earth, a film

Community
The Red Earth Playlist

Shop

Related Works
  1. Planetary Portals

Next Steps

Object Int’l —
Info
  1. The Red Earth Project is an ongoing artistic, interdisciplinary study centred on prose reflections and machine translation, drawing attention to the precarious status of non-western cultural heritage, knowledge systems and practices in the increasingly dominant Western systems of data, virtual architectures and AI technologies. This research asks how alternative cosmologies can be better represented within virtual architectures powered by probabalistic computation. 

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3. The Form


Exhibtion view: texts from Red Earth



The great Ursula K. Le Guin has been a champion of writing beyond what she calls the market economy of publishing and instead to write solely focusing on the art of writing.

Red Earth is an attempt at precisely this, where the writing drifts on  a current, ignoring form, thinking only about what experience and feeling will be communicated with the ideas and meditations across this project. 

The form then happens naturally—where I have always resisted definitions in life and now in writing. 

How should we remember fluid amalgams of experiences, influences, memories and lineages that go beyond records, destroyed or quickly forgotten? 

Exhibition view: texts from Red Earth